The Spanish Department has not only helped me continue to grow in my Spanish proficiency, but also challenged me to see the world with a wider global lens. The energetic and supportive professors, the convenient J-term immersion experiences, and the diversity of course topics make this department a fantastic place to learn! 

Emily Mueller ‘16

As a liberal arts college founded by Norwegian settlers and located in a community with a distinctly Norwegian flavor, Luther has a vital interest in other cultures and their languages. The goal of the Luther Spanish program is to help individuals develop their language skills and to acquire the cultural concepts necessary to understand and appreciate Hispanic society, culture, and literature.

Upon completing these studies, Luther graduates should be well-prepared for entry-level professional work or advanced graduate school programs. To assess student progress, the college makes available periodic language evaluations using accepted oral proficiency standards and procedures.

Students may choose to major or minor in Spanish or study it as part of programs such as International Studies. Many students at Luther who major or minor in Spanish also have another major.

Spanish in the World

Spanish is the most widely spoken of the Romance languages, and one of the four most spoken languages in the world (together with Chinese, Hindi, and English). Spanish is one of six official working languages of the United Nations and the official language of 22 countries, including most countries in Middle and South America .

Mexico, Colombia, Spain, and Argentina have the largest Spanish-speaking populations. In the United States, Spanish is spoken by three-quarters of its 41.3 million Hispanic population. Spanish holds co-official status in the U.S. territory of Puerto Rico.

Spanish World

Map: Wikimedia Commons, by Eddo, modified by Ste

The Spanish Department has challenged me to grow in all aspects of language learning: reading, writing, speaking, and translating. Faculty foster immersive experiences in the classroom, while the semester abroad requirement allows students to immerse themselves in the language and culture of a Spanish-speaking country.

Emily Alcock ‘17