Luther Alumni Magazine

Broad Horizons

Students on study-away programs share what they see through the lens.

Hailey Mohler '18, a communication studies major, spent spring 2018 on a study-away program in Dunedin, New Zealand. She took the cover photo during a weekend trip with flatmates to Mount Cook National Park.
Hailey Mohler '18, a communication studies major, spent spring 2018 on a study-away program in Dunedin, New Zealand. She took the cover photo during a weekend trip with flatmates to Mount Cook National Park.

Alexa Schroeder ’17 tied up her final semester of student teaching in Norway in fall 2017. She lived with Ruth Ann Sacquitne ’92 in Stjørdal, near Trondheim, and student taught at Fagerhaug International School, where Cherise (Storlie) Storlie-Kristoffersen ’97 is principal. This photo was taken at Skarvan-Roltdalen Nasjonalpark during her first weekend in Norway. “It rained the entire time we were hiking,” she says, “but when we got to our destination, this lake, we were able to explore with our hoods down, and I discovered this beautiful wooden boat. The contrast of colors and light inspired me to snap this photo.”
Alexa Schroeder ’17 tied up her final semester of student teaching in Norway in fall 2017. She lived with Ruth Ann Sacquitne ’92 in Stjørdal, near Trondheim, and student taught at Fagerhaug International School, where Cherise (Storlie) Storlie-Kristoffersen ’97 is principal. This photo was taken at Skarvan-Roltdalen Nasjonalpark during her first weekend in Norway. “It rained the entire time we were hiking,” she says, “but when we got to our destination, this lake, we were able to explore with our hoods down, and I discovered this beautiful wooden boat. The contrast of colors and light inspired me to snap this photo.”

Celia Gould ’19, an accounting and data science double major, spent J-term 2018 with the Working Japan: Religion and Corporate Culture in Japan course. This photo of Eihei-ji, a Buddhist temple in the mountains of the Fukui Prefecture, was taken by her Icelandic classmate, Áskell Jónsson, after a period of long meditation. Gould says, “We were not permitted to leave the monastery or look outdoors for three days, so the sight was even more beautiful to all of us who had missed being able to see nature for such a long time.”
Celia Gould ’19, an accounting and data science double major, spent J-term 2018 with the Working Japan: Religion and Corporate Culture in Japan course. This photo of Eihei-ji, a Buddhist temple in the mountains of the Fukui Prefecture, was taken by her Icelandic classmate, Áskell Jónsson, after a period of long meditation. Gould says, “We were not permitted to leave the monastery or look outdoors for three days, so the sight was even more beautiful to all of us who had missed being able to see nature for such a long time.”

Hailey Mohler ’18 studied in Dunedin, New Zealand, in spring 2017 through Academic Programs International. She writes: “This photo was taken from an eight-passenger plane flying from Milford Sound to Queenstown. This was easily the coolest experience I had while I was abroad. Flying over the infamous Milford Sound, seeing glaciers up close and personal, and watching the sunset over NZ was something that will never leave me.” 
Hailey Mohler ’18 studied in Dunedin, New Zealand, in spring 2017 through Academic Programs International. She writes: “This photo was taken from an eight-passenger plane flying from Milford Sound to Queenstown. This was easily the coolest experience I had while I was abroad. Flying over the infamous Milford Sound, seeing glaciers up close and personal, and watching the sunset over NZ was something that will never leave me.” 

Theatre major Matthew Espey ’19 spent J-term 2018 with the English Theatre: Mirror of Society and the Human Condition course. He writes: “I was not struck by the grandeur of the Fountains Abbey; I was struck by its history. How many people never saw the completion of the structure they devoted their lives to; how many who, in death, only had a dream of what it would look like when completed. Yet there I stood, hundreds of years later, pondering that exact same question.”
Theatre major Matthew Espey ’19 spent J-term 2018 with the English Theatre: Mirror of Society and the Human Condition course. He writes: “I was not struck by the grandeur of the Fountains Abbey; I was struck by its history. How many people never saw the completion of the structure they devoted their lives to; how many who, in death, only had a dream of what it would look like when completed. Yet there I stood, hundreds of years later, pondering that exact same question.”

Political science major Anna Phearman ’19 studied with the fall 2017 Lutheran College Washington Semester Program in Washington, D.C. She writes: “To me, this photo has all the main components of a classic D.C. experience: a rally of activists, a congressperson, the Capitol dome, and sweat stains from the unrelenting humidity!”
Political science major Anna Phearman ’19 studied with the fall 2017 Lutheran College Washington Semester Program in Washington, D.C. She writes: “To me, this photo has all the main components of a classic D.C. experience: a rally of activists, a congressperson, the Capitol dome, and sweat stains from the unrelenting humidity!”

Celia Gould ’19, an accounting and data science double major, spent J-term 2018 with the Working Japan: Religion and Corporate Culture in Japan course. This, she says, is “a deceiving but natural photo of skyscrapers in Tokyo, the light reflecting off of one to show neighboring buildings in the photo. Tokyo, a dizzyingly busy city, manages to provide a sense of calm as a result of the design and order in which the city functions.”
Celia Gould ’19, an accounting and data science double major, spent J-term 2018 with the Working Japan: Religion and Corporate Culture in Japan course. This, she says, is “a deceiving but natural photo of skyscrapers in Tokyo, the light reflecting off of one to show neighboring buildings in the photo. Tokyo, a dizzyingly busy city, manages to provide a sense of calm as a result of the design and order in which the city functions.”

While studying in New Zealand, Hailey Mohler ’18 took the opportunity to backpack with friends. She writes: “This picture was taken at about 6:30 a.m. when the sun woke my friends and me up in our tent somewhere near the base of Mount Somers. We’d hiked about halfway there the night before in the rain and fog with hopes to get to the top the next morning. Since it was so dark and foggy the night before, we had no idea what was around us when we got in our tent to sleep. Needless to say, we were not disappointed the next morning to wake up to this view.” 
While studying in New Zealand, Hailey Mohler ’18 took the opportunity to backpack with friends. She writes: “This picture was taken at about 6:30 a.m. when the sun woke my friends and me up in our tent somewhere near the base of Mount Somers. We’d hiked about halfway there the night before in the rain and fog with hopes to get to the top the next morning. Since it was so dark and foggy the night before, we had no idea what was around us when we got in our tent to sleep. Needless to say, we were not disappointed the next morning to wake up to this view.” 

Madie Miller ’19, who studied at Holden Village during the Environmental Issues in the Pacific Northwest course over J-term 2018, was happy to discover that Luther grad Travis Houle ’15 worked there as a naturalist, leading presentations and educational excursions. “Not only did our class connect with each other through living at Holden,” she says, “but we are now bonded to past and future Norse, such as Travis, who share our experiences of both places—the Luther campus and the Cascade Mountains.”
Madie Miller ’19, who studied at Holden Village during the Environmental Issues in the Pacific Northwest course over J-term 2018, was happy to discover that Luther grad Travis Houle ’15 worked there as a naturalist, leading presentations and educational excursions. “Not only did our class connect with each other through living at Holden,” she says, “but we are now bonded to past and future Norse, such as Travis, who share our experiences of both places—the Luther campus and the Cascade Mountains.”

Pilar Dritz ’18 took this time-lapse photo in summer 2017 at the summit of Laguna 69 in the Huaraz region of the Andes Mountains. She was studying in Peru on an International Studies Abroad rehabilitation service-learning and language-immersion program through which she worked in a children’s rehabilitation center for neurological disorders and lived with a host family in Lima. 
Pilar Dritz ’18 took this time-lapse photo in summer 2017 at the summit of Laguna 69 in the Huaraz region of the Andes Mountains. She was studying in Peru on an International Studies Abroad rehabilitation service-learning and language-immersion program through which she worked in a children’s rehabilitation center for neurological disorders and lived with a host family in Lima. 

Biology major Brendan Londergan ’19 took this photo in Flåm, Norway, during an Exploring the Ethics of Sustainable Organizations trip to Norway and Sweden over J-term 2018. “It was the true beauty of nature that inspired me,” he says. “The towering walls of the fjord instilled in me a sense of insignificance but also of protection as it made me feel like I was one with the earth.” 
Biology major Brendan Londergan ’19 took this photo in Flåm, Norway, during an Exploring the Ethics of Sustainable Organizations trip to Norway and Sweden over J-term 2018. “It was the true beauty of nature that inspired me,” he says. “The towering walls of the fjord instilled in me a sense of insignificance but also of protection as it made me feel like I was one with the earth.” 

Elementary education major Kelsey Chang ’20 spent J-term 2018 with the Language and Culture in Argentina course. She snapped this shot of Calle Florida from the balcony of the historic Cabildo in Buenos Aires.
Elementary education major Kelsey Chang ’20 spent J-term 2018 with the Language and Culture in Argentina course. She snapped this shot of Calle Florida from the balcony of the historic Cabildo in Buenos Aires.

Abbie Grinager ’20, a dance and psychology double major, spent J-term 2018 in Europe with the How Soccer Explains Europe course. She took this picture at Grand Place in Brussels, Belgium, and says: “I was amazed at the architecture, and to see it lit up at night created a special atmosphere.”
Abbie Grinager ’20, a dance and psychology double major, spent J-term 2018 in Europe with the How Soccer Explains Europe course. She took this picture at Grand Place in Brussels, Belgium, and says: “I was amazed at the architecture, and to see it lit up at night created a special atmosphere.”

Rafael Broseghini ’19, a computer science major, traveled to England, Belgium, Netherlands, and Germany with the 2018 J-term course How Soccer Explains Europe. About this photo, he says, “There is a sense of infinity here that I wanted to capture and keep forever. Even the car parked sideways does not interfere with the whole.”
Rafael Broseghini ’19, a computer science major, traveled to England, Belgium, Netherlands, and Germany with the 2018 J-term course How Soccer Explains Europe. About this photo, he says, “There is a sense of infinity here that I wanted to capture and keep forever. Even the car parked sideways does not interfere with the whole.”

Teryn Stiefel ’18, a nursing and psychology double major, traveled to Europe with the 2018 J-term course History and Memory of the Holocaust. She took this photo at the Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe in Berlin, Germany. She writes: “This memorial has 2,711 concrete slabs of varying heights and sizes arranged in rows that you are able to walk through. While walking through the memorial, you start to feel disoriented and even uneasy, and you are able to have space to try to wrap your mind around such an awful event in history.” 
Teryn Stiefel ’18, a nursing and psychology double major, traveled to Europe with the 2018 J-term course History and Memory of the Holocaust. She took this photo at the Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe in Berlin, Germany. She writes: “This memorial has 2,711 concrete slabs of varying heights and sizes arranged in rows that you are able to walk through. While walking through the memorial, you start to feel disoriented and even uneasy, and you are able to have space to try to wrap your mind around such an awful event in history.” 

Spanish and international studies double major Emma Johnson ’20 took this photo at Cementerio de la Recoleta during the 2018 J-term course Language and Culture in Argentina. “The concept of death is much different in Argentina,” she writes, “It is seen as a celebration of life. Cemeteries in that sense are decorated intricately in marvelous tombs and statues. This is the skyline of an area in the beautiful cemetery.” 
Spanish and international studies double major Emma Johnson ’20 took this photo at Cementerio de la Recoleta during the 2018 J-term course Language and Culture in Argentina. “The concept of death is much different in Argentina,” she writes, “It is seen as a celebration of life. Cemeteries in that sense are decorated intricately in marvelous tombs and statues. This is the skyline of an area in the beautiful cemetery.” 

English major Violet Hatfield ’18 spent J-term 2018 on the English Theatre: Mirror of Society and the Human Condition course that traveled to London, Stratford-Upon-Avon, and York in England and Edinburgh in Scotland. She took this photo of the London Eye while crossing the Thames.
English major Violet Hatfield ’18 spent J-term 2018 on the English Theatre: Mirror of Society and the Human Condition course that traveled to London, Stratford-Upon-Avon, and York in England and Edinburgh in Scotland. She took this photo of the London Eye while crossing the Thames.