Fall Semester 2015 Course Offerings

HIST-101-A: Intro to U.S. History for Elementary Education
Jacqueline Wilkie
1:30-2:30 MWF
This course provides a basic survey of the social, economic, political, and diplomatic history of the United States for the students with little background in U.S. history. Answering the questions: What is America and what does it mean to be American? What is the nature of U.S. democracy? How do the lives of ordinary people intersect with the great events of our past? The course will emphasize content that will be of greatest use for students preparing to teach social studies in the upper elementary grades. (HB, Hist, Intcl)

HIST-111-A: Survey of US History to 1877
Edward Tebbenhoff
11:00-12:00 MWF
This course surveys American history from the early colonial period to the end of Reconstruction in 1877. Topics are wide-ranging and include society, politics and culture but the overall theme emphasizes the evolution of the New England colonies, the Middle Colonies, the Chesapeake, and the Lower South into coherent regions with different economies, social structures and cultural attributes. The course then explores how these various regions successfully cooperated with one another long enough to engage in an independence movement that separated them from Great Britain and created the United States. These regional differences lived on into the nineteenth century, however, and became the basis for the sectional conflict which erupted into Civil War in 1861. The course closes with the successes and failures of Reconstruction policy as a bridge to later American history. (HBSSM, Hist)

HIST-126-A: Human Geography
Jacqueline Wilkie
11:00-12:30 TTh
A survey of world geography combining the regional and topical approaches, the natural factors that shape the environment, such as climate, landforms and resources, will be considered, along with their impact on people, as studied in the fields of political, economic, and cultural geography. The primary focus of the course will be on basic concepts in cultural geography that will be of greatest use for students preparing to teach middle school and high school social studies. (HBSSM, Intcl)

HIST-135-A: African-American History

Lauren Anderson
9:15-10:15 MWF
A survey of African-American history from the 17th century to the present. Highlights the issues and struggles of black people in their rural and urban context and places the African experience in America in the larger world considering, for example, the impact of events outside of America, such as the Haitian Revolution, British Emancipation of slavery, and European nationalism. (Same as AFRS 135) (HB, Hist, Intcl)

HIST-149-A: Europe to 1648
Robert Christman
9:15-10:15 MWF
An introductory survey of European history from ancient Greece to the end of the "Religious Wars" (and the Peace of Westphalia) in 1648. Topics will include: Greece from the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic Empires, Ancient Rome (Republic and Empire), Medieval Europe, the Renaissance, and the Reformation and the Age of Religious Wars. (HBSSM, Hist)

HIST-171-A: History of Africa to 1880
Festus Cole
1:30-2:30 MWF
Survey of African history from the earliest times to roughly about 1880. The course begins with the historical development of Africa's still-vital cultural, linguistic, social, and economic systems and moves on to examine the Islamic and Christian impact on these systems through the era of the Atlantic slave trade. The course concludes by discussing the ways in which early European colonialism affected the African past. (Same as AFRS 171) (HB, Hist)

HIST 239: Africa and the Two World Wars
Festus Cole
12:15-1:15 MWF
This course explores the fortunes of African societies during the First and Second World Wars. Often less known is Africa’s contribution to the war effort in both conflicts. The course introduces students to the recent reawakening in historians’ interest in Africa’s involvement in both World Wars. It debunks initial assumptions which regarded both wars as essentially European conflicts. Though the triggers for war originated in Europe, Africa, by dint of her colonial relationship with Europe could not have escaped the vicissitudes of both global crises. Taking its cue from the nineteenth century imperialism in Africa, it shows that though the quest for empire had begun to wane by 1901, African colonies had, by 1939, become firmly wedded to the interests of European metropoles. Topics covered include the continent’s military contribution in Africa, Europe and Asia, military logistics, and the wider impacts of both wars on African societies. Using selected primary and secondary sources, the course examines the military, socio-economic, political, religious, and medical consequences of both wars on Africa, and investigates the origins of African nationalism after 1945.  (Hist, HB)

HIST 239: Comparative Welfare States
Anna Peterson
12:45-2:15 TTh
This course will introduce students to a comparative and historical approach to the development of European welfare states. We will study both the theoretical underpinnings of welfare states and their particular temporal and spatial manifestations. This will include looking at a variety of European cases, including France, England, Germany, Norway, Sweden, Russia, and Italy, in order to answer questions regarding the who, what, where, why and when of welfare state development. Lectures and secondary source readings will provide students with the contextual foundation to evaluate and discuss primary source readings. These readings will expose students to the multitude of people involved in the creation of public policies and include topics ranging from philanthropy to eugenics. (Hist, HB, Inter)

HIST 241: Rome: Republic and Empire
Robert Christman

11:00-12:30 TTh
A survey of the Roman Republic and Empire, concentrating on the social and economic background of Rome's rise and fall as well as on the military and political aspects of expansion and decline. Special emphasis on the Punic and Macedonian wars, civil war and the end of the republic, Roman influence on France and Britain, Christianity in the imperial period, and Roman interaction with the Germans. Offered alternate years. (HBSSM, Hist)

HIST 254: Russian History
Anna Peterson
1:30-2:30 MWF
A general survey of Russian-Soviet history from the founding of Kievan Rus in 862 to the present day. Special emphasis given to the topic of empire, including interactions between people on the periphery and the core, the methods Russian/Soviet rulers used to expand and control territories and peoples, and how this changed over time.  (Historical, Human Behavior, Intercultural)

HIST 291: Environmental History
Brian Caton
2:30-4:00 TTh
This course introduces students to the field of environmental history. Students will examine the ways in which humans, plants, animals, and microbiota have acted as agents in the history of the world. The course emphasizes historical developments after 1300 and especially investigates the roles of science, colonialism, capitalism, and the state in changing the physical state of the environment and the ways humans understand their surroundings. Offered alternate years. (HBSSM, NWNL, Hist, Intcl)

HIST 321-A: Top US Hist: US and the Cold War
Edward Tebbenhoff
2:45-3:45 MWF
No other event of the twentieth century – not the Great Depression, the Second World War, or the Civil Rights Movement -- shaped American history, politics and culture more than the Cold War.  The Cold War created a world divided and dominated by two ideologically-opposed and antagonistic world powers, each possessing enough weaponry to destroy human civilization several times over.  The US and western European democracies exchanged economic, diplomatic, military and psychological threats with the Soviet Union and its satellites from 1945 to 1991 when the latter collapsed.  Quiet years of detente alternated with periods of intense political drama.  Open war between the US and the Soviets nearly broke out on several occasions, including the Berlin Blockade of 1948-49, the Berlin Crisis of 1961, and the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962.  In addition, wars in Korea, Vietnam and Afghanistan, plus a variety of smaller conflicts saw the two superpowers resorting to indirect war by proxy states to achieve their desired ends.  The course focuses on the US role in these events as well as the impact of the Cold War on American culture.  Prerequisites: curiosity and PAID 112 or equivalent.  HBSSM and HIST.  

HIST 355: The Reformation in Renaissance Europe
Victoria Christman
11:00-12:30 TTh
An in-depth analysis of the various elements of the Protestant and Catholic Reformations in the context of Renaissance Europe. The focus is on the traditions, beliefs, values, and theologies of the Christian religious reformation and the influences on that reformation from the many cross-cultural currents in the 16th century, in particular the ideas and methods promoted by the Renaissance thinkers. The course will also include various aspects of social, economic, and political history, as part of the effort to contextualize the reformers' ideas, as well as their impact across society. Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: PAID 112 or equivalent. (Rel, HBSSM, Hist)

HIST 485-A: Jr/Sr Sem: African Americans in the Jazz Age and Great Depression
Lauren Anderson
2:30-4:00 TTh
The period between World War I and World War II was a vibrant, violent time in African American History. The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) grew exponentially, fighting important legal battles and lobbying the federal government to pass anti-lynching legislation. Harlem, Chicago, Washington DC, and Paris became sites of active black arts communities, filled with jazz and blues musicians, novelists and poets, painters and dancers, and entrepreneur owners of the spaces in which they drank. In the world of athletics, the Negro Leagues developed into important sites for community gathering. Despite such dynamism, or perhaps because of it, cities across the nation erupted in racial conflict, often over the presence of black veterans returning home from WWI in their uniforms. When the Great Depression struck, African American unemployment hit 50%, a devastating rate high above the national average.

While contributing to your knowledge of the interwar period in African American history, this course will also explore different types of history, including social, economic, intellectual and cultural, family, and organizational.  But the focus of the course will be on research and writing.  By the end of the semester, students will produce a journal-length paper, an exercise that will increase their analytical and writing skills.  Along the way, we will collectively analyze the historiographic debates surrounding your topic, discuss your research, and evaluate your progress in research and writing.

HIST-490-A: Senior Project
Projects build upon students' previous experience with scholarly research and include both a substantial piece of writing as well as an oral presentation of the findings. Senior projects will be written under the direction of the faculty member most appropriate to the research topic. Each student will make individual arrangements with that professor.