February 2022

This page features weekly CELT Notes sent out to Luther College faculty members during the academic year 2021 - 2022.

 

February 2022

 

14. February 2022

 

Good morning!

 

Another quick CELT Notes - we have two great events coming up this week -- Trauma Yoga today and two workshops using Padlet later in the week. If you haven't been introduced to Padlet, it is a digital bulletin board that can be used for all sorts of in person and virtual applications. We are piloting the tool, so if you are interested please sign up!

 

Below are notices of upcoming events - the announcement of applications for Spring Teaching Partnerships and a short discussion of the Power of Why in student-centered teaching.

 

Upcoming CELT Events

 

Mental Health Mondays - Trauma Yoga - TODAY! (4 to 5 pm Valders 240) Register Here

 

The weight of the ongoing pandemic has taken a toll on our bodies and minds.  It's important to take time out of our busy schedules to actively attend to both our body and mind .  Join Bobbi-Jo Molokken from Counseling Service for a Trauma Responsive Yoga session.  This session will be primarily movement based with a brief introduction to the practice at the beginning.  This practice is gentle and suitable for all bodies and experiences levels. The practice is highly adaptable for physical limitations or injuries.  Participants should wear comfortable clothing they can move easily in and will need a chair.  You may bring a mat or towel for sitting on the floor or any other supports that increase your comfort but none are required.  Send any questions to [email protected]

 

CELT Workshop - Teaching with Padlet Register Here - TUESDAY (11:00 to 12:30pm VALDERS 240)

Join Christy Vrtis (Paideia) as she walks you through a useful Ed Tech tool  - PADLET. This workshop will introduce you to the tool and discuss ways you can leverage Padlet to foster student engagement and learning.

This workshop kicks off our Luther College pilot of Padlet.

 

CELT Workshop - Teaching with Padlet (Zoom Meeting) Register here. Thursday, February 17 2:30 to 4:00 

Join Christy Vrtis (Paideia) as she walks you through a useful Ed Tech tool  PADLET. This workshop will introduce you to the tool and discuss ways you can leverage Padlet to foster student engagement and learning. This is a repeat of Tuesday's offering given in a virtual format. 

This workshop kicks off our Luther College pilot of Padlet.

 

Spring Teaching Partnerships - Applications now open!

 

We are excited to announce that our Spring Teaching Partnerships are back.

 

Teaching Partnerships will be awarded to pairs of faculty who commit to visiting each other’s classes giving feedback on each other’s teaching, discussing challenges and successes in teaching, and sharing strategies for improving teaching effectiveness. Teaching Partners may be from the same or different departments. All faculty are eligible to apply.

 

Full details, including how to apply, are available on our website. Your short application is due on Tuesday, February 22. Successful applications will be announced on Friday, February 25.

 

The Power of Why

 

I know from my own experience - and from hearing from many of you -- that transforming your teaching to be responsive to individual students' needs sometimes has the unfortunate and unintended effect of adding to our workload to an unsustainable amount.

 

Flexibility is important (and here is another great article about granting students flexibility and grace given the ongoing pandemics and our current mental health crises on college campuses How to Give Students the Grace We All Need). But to quote Regan A. R. Gurung from Oregon State, "it is also important to be fair, and important to be firm." 


In a virtual webinar that Beckie Supiano discussed in a recent Chronicle of Higher Ed Teaching newsletter, Gurung discussed his teaching philosophy as one of care, which I think will resonate with many of you. However, caring does not mean simply giving in to student desires willy nilly. Care also means accountability on your part as well as the students' part. So yes, be flexible, but also think carefully about what aspects of your course are fixed. It is more than okay to be firm on policies that are important to the integrity of the course, but Gurung stresses that  we need to make sure to tell the students WHY certain elements of our class remain fixed.

 

Isis Artze-Vega, from Valencia College, followed up that this communication of the WHY, "is a form of respect for our students" and I totally agree. If you can't articulate why an assignment, deadline, or other course element is there, then maybe this is a place for flexibility or a student-driven change.

 

A last note: Artze-Vega also mentioned that you can be a "really important why. Your wellness, your boundaries, the limits on your time are super-. super-important." Just make sure to communicate those to your students.

 

You can register for the on-demand recording here. One note: there was significant discussion on how a professor's identities impact how students may hear, understand, and accept course policies. More on this in a later CELT Notes.

 

I hope your week is off to a good start!

 

Kate