The academic catalog is currently being updated for the 2019-20 year. View the Catalog Archive to access the 2018-19 catalog as well as catalogs from previous years.

German

Nancy Gates Madsen (department head), Elizabeth Steding (section head), Sören Steding (Münster program director)

Required for a major: Thirty-two hours, including eight hours in German above 300; up to eight hours may have English as the language of instruction (with prior approval by the German program); language immersion experience; a senior project (unless this is completed in another major); an oral proficiency examination in German. Writing requirement completed with GER 330, 340, 460 or 470.

Recommended supporting courses for students majoring in German: Courses in German history; politics and anthropology; courses in another modern or classical language; courses in linguistics.

Required for a minor: No fewer than 18 hours, including four hours above 300; language immersion experience; an oral proficiency examination in German.

Language immersion experience: For majors, a minimum of one semester of academic study in a country where German is an official language. For minors, at least one January Term (or a similar program) of academic study in such a country, although a semester is strongly recommended. Program selection must be approved by the department for all majors and minors prior to departure. Luther College offers a semester program in Münster, Germany, every other year (2020, 2022). However, other programs may also fulfill this requirement. All majors and minors are strongly urged to help maintain and advance their language skills by completing courses in German during their final semesters at Luther. 

Language Learning Center

The department of Modern Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics has a Language Learning Center in Main Building. Language students have access to computerized language learning materials, to computers with audio and video editing software, and to video study rooms where they may view prerecorded foreign language videos and DVDs or watch live international TV. The Language Learning Center also houses the department's Foreign Language Media Library with over 800 foreign language films and a selection of leisure reading books and audio books for language learners. Students can check out these materials as well as audio and video equipment for their class assignments. The Language Learning Center also provides language students with valuable work-study experiences related to their interest in languages.

German Courses

GER 101 Identity and Language

  • 4 hours

Who are the Germans? Who are you when you speak German? How does language allow us to be ourselves? Explore personal and cultural identity in the German-speaking world. Develop basic language skills (speaking, listening, reading, writing) to be able to communicate in everyday situations.

GER 102 Community and Language

  • 4 hours
  • Prerequisites: GER 101

How do German-speakers live in community? How and where can you fit in? How are communities formed by language? Explore traditions, institutions and lifestyles in the German speaking world. Continue to develop cultural competency and basic language skills (speaking, listening, reading, writing) to be able to communicate in everyday situations.

GER 105 Munster Preparation

  • 1 hour

This course prepares students accepted to the Munster Semester for the semester abroad. Requires acceptance to the Munster Program. This course does not count towards the German major or minor.

GER 201 Intermediate German

  • 4 hours
  • Prerequisites: GER 102

Completion of basic grammatical structures. Beginning composition and conversation through greater emphasis on the creative aspects of language use, i.e., speaking and writing.

GER 210 German in Action

  • 4 hours
  • Prerequisites: GER 102

Apply your German skills in real-world contexts! This course is thematically-based, using topics such as film, comics, art, music, or Berlin to help students develop cultural competency and intermediate-level language skills. Students may take the course twice (with different topics).

GER 346 Introduction to German Literature: From Runes to Rap

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Human Expression—Primary Texts, Historical
  • Prerequisites: GER 202

Modern German literature and film often draw from significant works of their artistic predecessors. This course offers a general introduction to the principle literary forms of prose, poetry, and drama, as illustrated by some of the best known authors of the German-speaking world. Attention will be paid to increasing students' fluency in writing.

GER 450 Masterpieces of German Literature

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Human Expression—Primary Texts
  • Prerequisites: GER 202 and one German course at the 300 level

The course focuses on masterpieces of poetry, prose and drama in German through 1900, with attention on the continuing impact of these works on modern German culture. Significant practice in writing,m including a research project. May be repeated up to three times for credit under three different topics. Offered on a rotating basis.

GER 460 Contemporary German Literature And Culture

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Human Expression—Primary Texts
  • Prerequisites: GER 210 or consent of instructor.

A course with emphasis on literature and culture of the 20th and 21st century. Study in depth of a particular topic as seen through primary texts, with special attention given to contemporary texts and topics. Significant practice in writing, including a research project and assessment of speaking skills. Offered on a rotating basis.

GER 470 Topics in German Literature and Culture

  • 4 hours
  • Fulfills: Human Expression—Primary Texts
  • Prerequisites: GER 210 or consent of instructor.

Study in depth of a particular topic as seen through primary texts. The focus will vary each time, and may include topics such as women writers, social criticism, the environment, East and West, the Holocaust, German media. Significant practice in writing, including a research project. May be repeated for credit up to three times under three different topics. Offered on a rotating basis.

GER 490 Senior Project

  • 1, 2, or 4 hours

The senior project requirement gives students an opportunity to participate in independent study, to read relevant sources in their chosen area, to develop methods of research and analysis appropriate to their selected topic, and to construct a sustained argument in the language of their major. To enrich their work, students will be encouraged to reflect on and use their study-abroad and firsthand cultural experiences as a means of contextualizing their projects. Assessment includes the paper, the process, and the required formal presentation of the project at end of term. If students have another major in addition to German, they are not required to complete a senior project in both majors.