Russian Studies Courses

RUS 101, 102 Beginning Russian I, II

4, 4 hours

Introduction to Russian grammar through reading, writing, listening, and speaking in Russian. The course will focus upon developing speaking and listening comprehension skills with a framework of practical vocabulary and grammatical structures. The student will also gain an appreciation of Russian culture and contemporary life through music and audiovisual materials. Prerequisite for RUS 102: RUS 101 or equivalent.

RUS 139, 239, 339, 439 Special Topics

Credit arr.

RUS 185 First-Year Seminar

4 hours

A variety of seminars for first-year students offered each January Term.

RUS 201, 202 Intermediate Russian

4, 4 hours

A continuation of the study of Russian grammar. Speaking proficiency will be developed through active class participation. Emphasis will be placed on developing writing skills in Russian and in reading authentic texts. Students will continue developing listening comprehension skills through use of music and audiovisual materials. Prerequisite for RUS 201: RUS 102. Prerequisite for RUS 202: RUS 201 or equivalent.

RUS 241 Russian Culture Through Film

4 hours

This course will cover 20th-century Russian/Soviet culture and history through the medium of film. We will begin with classics of early Soviet film (including Eisenstein, Vertov, Pudovkin) and then view and discuss classic films of the Stalinist era and WWII (1930s–'50s). We will continue with classic films and comedies of the 1960s and '70s (including Ryazanov, Gaidai, Tarkovsky). The later 1980s-'90s (glasnot, perestroika, and the post-Soviet era) witnessed the emergence of films the revealed difficult social and historical themes (for example: Little Vera; Burnt by the Sun; Prisoner of the Caucaus; Brother I). The course will conclude with discussion of film and society in present-day Russia. Films are in Russian (with English subtitles). Readings and discussion are in English but certain assignments will be completed in Russian. Students without background in Russian language should enroll in FCUL 241. Offered on a rotating basis. Prerequisite: RUS 202 or consent of instructor. (HEPT, Hist, Intcl)

RUS 243 Time of Stalin: Literature and Memoirs

4 hours

This course, through the medium of literature and memoirs, focuses on Russia/Soviet Union in the early years after the Bolshevik Revolution (1917) until Gorbachev's glasnost and perestroika. Students will learn about the rise of Stalin, the time of terror and purges at the height of Stalin's regime (mid-1930s), WWII, the "Thaw" after Stalin's death in 1953, and the implications Stalinism has on present-day Russia. We will seek answers to the questions of how Stalin was allowed to rise to power, retain political control, and instigate policies that caused the deaths of approximately 20 million Soviet citizens—many of whom were Bolsheviks and loyal members of the Communist Party. Literary readings include memoirs, poetry, and novels. A significant part of the course concerns the role of women in the Bolshevik Revolution and their fate under Stalinism. This course fulfills requirements of international studies, women's studies, and Russian studies. Readings and discussion are in English but certain assignments will be completed in Russian. Students without a background in Russian language should enroll in FCUL 243/WGST 243. Offered on a rotating basis. Prerequisite: RUS 202 or consent of the instructor. (HEPT, Hist, Intcl, E, W)

RUS 285/295 Directed Study

2, 4 hours

An opportunity to pursue individualized or experiential learning with a faculty member, at the sophomore level or above, either within or outside the major. RUS 285 can be taken only during January term, RUS 295 can be taken during the fall, spring, or summer terms.

RUS 341 Russian Life and Culture

4 hours

A study of the cultural, political, and social institutions that have shaped Russia from the time of Kievan Rus' to the present period. Key historical and philosophical themes will be discussed in reference to art, literature, architecture, music, and Russian Orthodoxy. The course is taught in English and readings are in English, but students will complete certain assignments in Russian. Students without a background in Russian language should enroll in FCUL 341. Offered on a rotating basis. Prerequisite: RUS 202, or consent of instructor. (HE, Hist, Intcl)

RUS 345 Conversation and Composition

4 hours

Emphasis on the development of written and oral expression and mastery of grammar. Reading and listening comprehension will be developed through use of authentic texts (literary and popular press), films, video (news and popular media), and song texts. Speaking and writing skills will be developed within this context of authentic materials. Prerequisite: RUS 202. (L, W)

RUS 350 Topics in Russian/Soviet Literature

4 hours

This course will offer reading and discussion of literature of various genres, authors and time periods of Russia and the USSR. Topics will change annually and rotate. Students may enroll in the course multiple times for credit (and count towards the major/minor in Russian Studies), provided that the topic is new. The course is taught in English and readings and writing assignments are in English. Russian language students who have completed the prerequisite of RUS 202 may elect to enroll in this course, rather than FCUL 350, for supplementary assignments in Russian. Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: RUS 202. (HEPT, W)

RUS 375 Directed Readings

1, 2, or 4 hours

RUS 395 Independent Study

1, 2, or 4 hours

RUS 490 Senior Project

1, 2, or 4 hours

RUS 493 Senior Honors Project

4 hours

A yearlong independent research project. Applications are completed on the Honors Program form available at the registrar's office, requiring the signatures of a faculty supervisor, the department head, the honors program director, and the registrar. Interdisciplinary projects require the signatures of two faculty supervisors. The project must be completed by the due date for senior projects. The completed project is evaluated by a review committee consisting of the faculty supervisor, another faculty member from the major department, and a faculty member from outside the major department. All projects must be presented publicly. Only projects awarded an "A- or A" qualify for "department honors" designation. The honors project fulfills the all-college senior project requirement.