In the words of an American Bar Association (ABA) statement, “Students who are successful in law school, and who become accomplished lawyers or use their legal education successfully in other areas of professional life, come to their legal education from widely differing educational and experiential backgrounds.” In short, there is no best major or pre-law curriculum for entering and doing well in law school.

Luther promotes this applied interest in legal studies by offering individual legal courses while allowing students to develop other areas of interest. Through this process, you'll walk away not only with a strengthened interest in the law, but also an area of interest in which you can apply your future legal studies.

3+3 Option with Drake and University of Iowa Law Schools

Luther has agreements with the law schools at Drake University and The University of Iowa that enable students to begin law school after the junior year. Students interested in this option can go through the regular law school application during their junior year and must be accepted  by Drake or University of Iowa. If accepted, they will receive the B.A. degree from Luther after successfully completing the first year of law school. Students opting for this must have completed 96 credit hours at Luther, all of the general education requirements, and all of the requirements for the major prior to matriculating at the law school.

We believe that there are good reasons for doing the traditional four years at Luther prior to entering law school, but we also recognize that for some students this 3+3 approach makes sense. Students considering this option need to work closely with their academic advisor and either of the pre-law advisors (John Moeller and Steve Holland).

Who earns law degrees?

In the past 15 years, Luther alumni with the majors in accounting, business management, chemistry, classics, economics, English, French, German, history, philosophy, religion, political science, psychology, and sociology have earned law degrees.

Luther's focus on critical thought through its liberal arts education has developed in undergraduates of all different majors the analytical skills needed in the practice of law.