• Matt Cox, Exhibit Developer

    "Luther not only helped me discover what I love to do, but also that I should always be looking to expand my knowledge and skills. I’ve learned that it's critical to continue learning and growing in your profession."

Matt Cox '08

A Pivotal Moment  

“I initially considered teaching as a career. When I realized it wasn’t for me, I met with my advisor, we talked about my concerns, and he gave some options for me to consider,” Matt says. “I enrolled in his January Term history course and he recommended that I look into museum studies. That was the first time I had ever considered museum work as a career. I believe that moment helped me find my calling to become a museum professional.”

Preparing for His Career

“My advisor and instructors at Luther knew how competitive the museum field could be and recommended that I look into getting my M.A. after graduation,” Matt says. “Knowing I wanted to enter a competitive profession pushed me to take on as many internships and volunteer positions as I could to help get into a good program and continue to grow my resume. Luther not only helped me discover what I love to do, but also that I should always be looking to expand my knowledge and skills. I’ve learned that it's critical to continue learning and growing in your profession.”

The Path to His Current Job

“After getting my M.A. from the Cooperstown Graduate Program, I worked as an exhibit developer at Split Rock Studios, an exhibition design firm,” Matt says. “Most recently, I joined the team at the Minnesota Children’s Museum, working on a ‘Thomas & Friends’ traveling exhibit and an upcoming 28-million-dollar museum expansion.”

Feels Luther Prepared Him Well

“I’m lucky enough to work in a profession that allows me to use my major and minor every single day,” Matt says. “Beyond the valuable historical knowledge I gained, I learned critical thinking, writing skills, and a work discipline that has helped me succeed in my professional life.”

Co-Curriculars

Balance is Key

Too many extracurricular activities (on and off campus) can damage your academic performance. And too much time spent on academics can lead to stress and an unhealthy personal life. Find a balance that works for you and you’ll find that you’ll be able to enjoy the Luther experience, both in and out of the classroom.

—Matt Cox '08