Luther nursing students spend their junior year engaged in hands-on, real-world learning through a nursing clinical experience. Luther’s nursing program is privileged to enjoy a close relationship with the Mayo Clinic—in fact, the program was founded in 1974 with support from a Mayo affiliate that found itself in need of qualified nurses—and our nursing students are therefore able to gain clinical experience at Rochester Methodist Hospital and St. Marys Hospital, affiliates of the Mayo Clinic; the Federal Medical Center; and a variety of community-based health-care agencies in Rochester, Minn. With these highly esteemed institutions on their resumes, our nursing graduates are well positioned to begin their post-college lives.

In addition, our nursing students have the opportunity to gain patient-care experiences through study-away programs in Nottingham, England, and other destinations.

For more information about internship opportunities at Luther, visit Luther College Career Center’s internship program.

Anna Solheim

Anna as a nurseWhen: January 2016
Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN

Over J-term, Anna interned at Mayo Clinic in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit. She took on the role as a registered nurse and had her own patients under the supervision of a preceptor. Additionally, she learned skills such as monitoring and assessing patients with ventilators and administering feeding tubes, and IV medication. The most rewarding part of her internship was the ability to witness the health of children improve. Anna was also able to learn how important teamwork is as a nurse since it makes the nursing unit more effective. Most of all, Anna learned that it’s important for patients to count on the nurses. After this internship, Anna has more confidence as a nurse and can’t wait to enter the medical field.

Christine Morrow

Christine Morrow '16 interns at a hospital in FranceWhen: January 2014
Where: l'Hôtel Dieu, Pont l'Abbé, France; Centre Hospitalier de Cornouaille, Quimper, France
Major: Nursing

Christine Morrow spent one month observing in hospitals in France. Despite the limitations due to language and medical barriers, she was able to serve the hospitals in numerous ways. Some days included leading daily patient activities and teaching them about American and Breton culture. Other days she shadowed nurses, checking vitals and blood sugar levels. Christine enjoyed the rewarding experience because of the many lessons that she learned about French and American approaches to healthcare. She also gained confidence in her French speaking skills, especially with medical vocabulary. As a result, she hopes to take her nursing career abroad in the future.