Cite Electronic Sources

Check with your professor to determine which citation style is required for your research. For the Paideia research paper, you will use either the MLA (Modern Language Association) style or the CMS (Chicago Manual of Style) style for your citations. Make sure you double-check to find out which style you need to use.

The examples below have been simplified and customized for use in Paideia I. The examples do not reflect format, but do give complete citation information.

In addition to the citation examples listed below, copies of the style book easyWriter are available in the library at the Reference Desk. More examples of citing electronic sources can be found in the style manuals listed below, which are also available at the Reference Desk in Preus Library:

MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, 6th ed., pp. 207-235.
Chicago Manual of Style, 15th ed., pp. 684-686, 696-698, 702-703, and 714-716.

View citation examples for:

Full-text journal articles from library databases
Full-text newspaper articles from library databases
Electronic books (e-books)
Web sites

For other questions about electronic resource citations:

View FAQ about citations

Citation Examples

Full-text journal articles from library databases

Use this citation format for full-text articles from Academic Search

,

JSTOR, and Project MUSE

.

MLA Style 5.9.4 (pp. 221-224) and 5.9.7 (pp. 229-230)

Works Cited List

Author's last name, First name. "Title of Article." Journal Title Volume.Issue (Year): Page numbers. Name of database Name of Library, Date article accessed <URL of database>.
Laurence, Ray. "Metaphors, Monuments and Texts: The Life Course in Roman Culture." World Archaeology 31.3 (2000): 442-455. Academic Search Premier Preus Library, 10 Jan. 2005 <http://search.epnet.com>.

CMS (Chicago Manual of Style) 17.180+ (pp.696-698)

Endnote/Footnote

1. Author's first name and last name, "Title of Article," Journal Title Volume number, Issue number (Year): Page number. Name of database Name of Library (Date you accessed the article).
1. Ray Laurence, "Metaphors, Monuments and Texts: The Life Course in Roman Culture," World Archaeology 31, no. 3 (2000): 447. Academic Search Premier Preus Library (accessed February 23, 2005).

Bibliography (Works Cited, Literature Cited, References)

Author's last name, First name. "Title of the Article." Journal title Volume number, Issue number (Year): Page numbers. Name of database Name of Library (Date you accessed the article).
Laurence, Ray. "Metaphors, Monuments and Texts: The Life Course in Roman Culture." World Archaeology 31, no. 3 (2000): 442-455. Academic Search Premier Preus Library (accessed February 23, 2005).

 

Full-text newspaper articles from library databases

This format is for citing the New York Times or other full-text papers from the Preus Library databases.

MLA Style 5.9.4 b (pp. 222-223) and 5.9.7 (pp.229-230)

Works Cited List

Author's Last name, first name. "Article Title." Name of newspaper Date of article, Paper edition: Page number(s). Name of Database Name of Library, Date article accessed <URL of database>.
Bernstein, Nina. "Immigrants reverse their trek as American dreams fade." New York Times 10 Nov. 2004, East Coast ed.: B1. ProQuest Preus Library, 17 Jan. 2005 <http://proquest.umi.com/login?COPT=
U01EPTQmSU5UPTAmREJTPTcy>.

CMS (Chicago Manual of Style) 17.198+ (pp. 702-703)

Endnote/Footnote

1. Author's first name Last name, "Article Title," Name of Newspaper, Date of article, URL of article (date you accessed the article).
1. Nina Bernstein, "Immigrants reverse their trek as American dreams fade," New York Times, November 10, 2004, http://proquest.umi.com/
login?COPT=U01EPTQmSU5UPTAmREJTPTcy (accessed January 17, 2005.

Bibliography (Works Cited, Literature Cited, References)

Author's last name, first name. "Article Title." Name of Newspaper, Date of article. URL of article (date you accessed the article).
Bernstein, Nina. "Immigrants reverse their trek as Amerian dreams fade." New York Times, November 10, 2004. http://proquest.umi.com/
login?COPT=U01EPTQmSU5UPTAmREJTPTcy (accessed January 17, 2005).

 

Electronic books (e-books)

Access to electronic books is available through WorldCat Local, the library's online catalog.

MLA Style 5.9.3 (pp. 218-220)

Works Cited List

Author's last name, First name. Title of book. Place of publication: Publisher,Year. E-book publisher, Name of Library. Date of access.
LeBlanc, Robin M. Bicycle Citizens: The Political World of the Japanese Housewife. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1999. NetLibrary, Preus Library. 21 February 2005.

 

CMS (Chicago Manual of Style) 17.142+ (pp. 684-686)

Endnote/Footnote

1. Author's first and last name, Book Title, (Place of publication: Publisher, Year), URL (date you accessed the work).
1. Robin M. LeBlanc, Bicycle Citizens: The Political World of the Japanese Housewife, (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1999), http://www.netlibrary.com/urlapi.asp?action=summary&v=1&bookid=34738 (accessed February 21, 2005).

Bibliography (Works Cited, Literature Cited, References)

Author's last name, First name. Book Title. Place of publication: Publisher, Year. URL (Date you accessed the work).
LeBlanc, Robin M. Bicylce Citizens: The Political World of the Japanese Housewife. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1999. http://www.netlibrary.com/urlapi.asp?action=summary&v=1&bookid=34738 (accessed February 21, 2005).

 

Web sites

Because information available on the World Wide Web is constantly changing, there is not one standard way to cite Internet resources such as web pages and web sites. The examples given below contain basic information; in some cases, you may have more elements to add to your citation. Consult the appropriate style manual for more examples.

MLA Stlye 5.9.1, 5.9.2 (pp. 207-218)

Works cited

Author's last name, First name. "Title of the web page." Title of the web site. Name of the editor of the site. Date of electronic publication or latest update. Name of institution or organization sponsoring the site. Date you accessed the source. <URL of web page>.
Linder, Douglas. "The Dakota Conflict Trials 1862" Famous American Trials. Ed. Douglas Linder. 2005. U. of Missouri Kansas City Law School. 23 February 2005. <http://www.law.umkc.edu/faculty/projects/
ftrials/dakota/dakota.html>.

CMS (Chicago Manual of Style) 17.237+ (pp. 714-716)

Endnote/Footnote

Author's name. "Title of the web page," Title of the web site, URL of the web page (Date you accessed the page).
Douglas Linder. "The Dakota Conflict Trials 1862," Famous American Trials, http://www.law.umkc.edu/faculty/projects/ftrials/dakota/dakota.html (accessed February 23, 2005).

Bibliography (Works Cited, Literature Cited, References)

Author's last name, First name. "Title of the web page." Title of the web site. URL of the resource (Date you accessed the page).
Linder, Douglas. "The Dakota Conflict Trials 1862." Famous American Trials. http://www.law.umkc.edu/faculty/projects/ftrials/dakota/dakota.html (accessed February 23, 2005).

FAQ about citations

For additional help with these and more questions, consult a librarian.

1. What if there are no page numbers on my full-text article?

Some of the full-text articles in databases such as Academic Search Premier do not include page numbers in the HTML version of the articles. If you have the option to view the full-page image (PDF version) of your article, page numbers will appear there, and you should choose this option. In the case where only HTML format is available without pagination, see the examples below for how to deal with this situation.

 

MLA Style 5.9.4 (pp. 221-222) and 6.4.2 (pp. 244-247)

Works Cited List

Author's last name, First name. "Title of the article." Journal title Volume.Issue, (Year): number of paragraphs. Name of database Name of Library, Date you accessed the article <URL of database>.
Laurence, Ray. "Metaphors, Monuments and Texts: The Life Course in Roman Culture." World Archaeology 31.3, (2000): 14 pars. Academic Search Premier Preus Library, 24 Feb. 2005. <http://search.epnet.com>.

CMS (Chicago Manual of Style) 17.181 (pp.696-697)

Endnote/Footnote

1. Author's first and last name, "Title of article," Journal title Volume number, Issue number (Year), under "descriptive locator," Name of database Name of Library, (date you accessed the article).
1. Ray Laurence, "Metaphors, Monuments and Texts: The Life Course in Roman Culture," World Archaeology 31, no. 3 (2000), under "Things become less certain," Academic Search Premier Preus Library (accessed February 24, 2005).

Bibliography (Works Cited, Literature Cited, References)

Author's last name, First name. "Title of article." Journal title Volume number, Issue number (Year): page range. Name of database Name of Library (Date article accessed).
Laurence, Ray. "Metaphors, Monuments and Texts: The Life Course in Roman Culture." World Archaeology 31, no. 3 (2000): 442-455. Academic Search Premier Preus Library (accessed February 24, 2005).

 

2. How do I cite an article from the online Encyclopaedia Britannica?

You will need the same information from the online article as you would from a print encyclopedia article, including the author's name (if available), the article title, title of the encyclopedia, and the date you accessed the article. See the examples below, from the Encyclopaedia Britannica Online

 

 

MLA Style 5.9.1 (pp. 207-216)

"Parthenon" Encyclopaedia Britannica Online. 2005. Encyclopaedia Britannica. Preus Library. 23 February 2005. <http://www.search.eb.com/
bol/topic?eu=60053&sctn=1>.

 

CMS (Chicago Manual of Style) 17.239 (p. 716)

Endnote/Footnote

Encyclopaedia Britannica Online, s.v. "Parthenon," <http://www.search.eb.com/ bol/topic?eu=60053&sctn=1> (accessed February 23, 2005).

 

Use the same citation style for similar online resources, such as the American National Biography, the New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, or the Oxford English Dictionary.

 

3. Where can I find more examples of how to cite online sources?

 

The library has many citation handbooks, including easyWriter, the MLA Handbook, the Chicago Manual of Style and others. The resources are kept at the Reference Desk and can be used at any time. Ask a librarian if you need help using these style guides.