Sociology Courses

SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology

4 hours

Introduction to theoretical perspectives and foundational principles of "thinking sociologically." Key concepts include: culture, inequality/poverty, deviance/crime, gender, social construction of reality, social change, and social structure. (HBSSM)

SOC 139, 239, 339, 439 Special Topics

Credit arr.

SOC 185 First-Year Seminar

4 hours

A variety of seminars for first-year students offered each January Term.

SOC 242 Sociology of Gender

4 hours

Examines the gendered structure of our everyday lives; makes gendered assumptions and practices explicit; and uncovers the impact of gender in the social world. Emphasis on historical and cross cultural constructions of gender that provide alternatives to gender inequality and a basis for social change. Prerequisite: SOC 101. (Same as WGST 242) (HBSSM)

SOC 253 Crime and Deviance

4 hours

A theoretical analysis of the relationship of deviant behavior and subcultures to community standards of conventional behavior as expressed in law and norms, as well as an analysis of the extent, distribution, and character of crime and delinquency. Prerequisite: SOC 101. (HBSSM)

SOC 261 Social Conflict

4 hours

Course will examine the origin, escalation, and resolution of social conflict at three levels: interpersonal, intergroup (e.g. ethnic group, economic class), and international. Focuses on major causes of conflict including: ethnic identity, competition for material resources, and ideological differences. Expressions of conflict will be examined including: hatred, electoral action, labor union activity, violence, war, and terrorism. Interventions to minimize the negative social impacts of conflict will be considered for each level of conflict. Prerequisite: SOC 101. Offered alternate years. (HBSSM)

SOC 273 Crime and Media

4 hours

This course examines relationships between elements of the criminal justice system and elements of the mass media, and how each influences the other. Included will be discussion of crime depiction in news media (TV, newspapers, internet), crime depiction in entertainment media (music, TV, video games, film) and use of media/media technology by law enforcement and criminal defendants. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or COMS 133. (HBSSM)

SOC 276 Social Theory and Praxis

4 hours

This course gives students knowledge of and experience with the classical and contemporary perspectives on human social behavior. Students will study the original works of theorists, critically analyze their ideas, and apply these perspectives to current events, media artifacts, and sociological topics. This course is highly recommended for students considering further study in graduate school. Prerequisite: SOC 101. (HBSSM)

SOC 283 Sociology of Education

4 hours

This course provides a broad overview of the field of sociology of education and its goal is to understand the relationship between education and society. This course reviews a variety of theoretical perspectives and empirical research to examine the role and structure of schooling in contemporary life. Topics include social mobility and stratification; social reproduction and meritocracy; social and cultural capital; the dynamics of race, class, and gender in American higher education; the social processes and factors affecting students' academic achievement; horizontal and vertical stratification of higher education. Students will better understand their own experience within educational system, as well as the relationship between educational system and inequality in American society. Prerequisite: SOC 101. (HBSSM)

SOC 285/295 Directed Study

2, 4 hours

An opportunity to pursue individualized or experiential learning with a faculty member at the sophomore level or above, either within or outside the major. SOC 285 can be taken only during January Term, SOC 295 can be taken during the fall, spring, or summer terms.

SOC 290 Visual Sociology

4 hours

In this course students will explore the theory and method of visual sociology and have the opportunity to pursue their own projects. As a group and individually, we will explore the social milieu from a visual perspective to answer such questions as: What does the visual world tell us about our society? What meaning and importance do we attach to the visual? What can we learn about human behavior by examining visual culture? Students will collect their own data, analyze it, and report their findings Camera needed (of any type). Note: If taken during the January Term, this course would meet the January II general graduation requirement. (HBSSM)

SOC 301 Research Methodology

4 hours

Examines the process of conducting and evaluating sociological research. Areas of emphasis include: research design, techniques of sampling, methods of data collection, principles of measurement, basic methods of data analysis, and ethical considerations. Prerequisite: SOC 101 and junior standing. (HBSSM, W)

SOC 345 Race, Class, and Gender in Contemporary Society

4 hours

An assessment of how race, class, and gender influence the attainment of societal honors, rewards, and power in the United States today. Similarities and differences in social structures and ideologies of modern society are emphasized for race, class, and gender. Prerequisite: SOC 101. (HBSSM, Intcl)

SOC 347 Sociology of the Family

4 hours

Consideration of the historical and cultural foundations of the institution of marriage and the family. Emphasis on cross-cultural trends as they relate to the family, including socialization practices, changing status of women, and dating patterns. Prerequisite: SOC 101. (HBSSM)

SOC 350 Social Statistics

4 hours

A first course in applied statistics that introduces descriptive and inferential statistics with a focus on developing and testing sociological hypotheses using quantitative data. Students will use statistical software to input and analyze their own small-scale survey data, as well as develop and test hypotheses using large, publicly available sociological datasets. Prerequisites: SOC 101, MATH 110 or above. (HBSSM)

SOC 351 Gender and Crime

4 hours

Examines how gender affects individuals' experiences as both victims and perpetrators of crime and deviance. Analyzes the history and theory of gender and crime in the U.S. and internationally, the social construction of victimization, and the impact of culture, structure, and inequality on criminal behavior. Prerequisite: SOC 101. (Same as WGST 351) (HBSSM)

SOC 356 Environmental Sociology

4 hours

Examines how cultural, social, and economic forces shape the relationships between societies and their natural environments. Environmental dynamics such as pollution and natural resource use are connected with social dynamics of human population, industrial production, poverty, urban planning, and consumer culture. Examination of environmental movements and counter-movements illustrate how understandings of the natural environment change over time and are often in contention. Prerequisite: SOC 101. (HBSSM)

SOC 358 Social Psychology

4 hours

A study of the relationship between the individual and society and the interactions produced. Emphasis on research in the areas of self, identity, symbolic interaction, and social movements. Prerequisite: SOC 101. (HBSSM)

SOC 380 Internship

1, 2, or 4 hours

Course graded credit/no credit.

SOC 381 Internship

1, 2, or 4 hours

Course graded A–F.

SOC 395 Independent Study

1, 2, or 4 hours

SOC 453 Seminar: Law and Human Rights

4 hours

Examines the construction and application of law by various societies, with a particular focus on international and human rights law. Studies the people and groups who create law, the development of human rights, the effects of race, class, gender and nationality on legal standards, and the impact of globalization on international law. Prerequisite: SOC 101. (HBSSM, Intcl)

SOC 461 Seminar: Contempory Issues of Immigration

4 hours

This upper-division undergraduate seminar will provide an overview of issues related to international immigration to the United States. This class involves the sociological analysis of immigration, particularly with respect to intercultural dynamics between the sending and the receiving countries, race and ethnicity, social structure, social inequality, and social policy. Students will learn about sociological theories of immigrant incorporation as well as specific issues related to the second-generation children of immigrants including their educational, labor-market and transnational experiences. They will also learn about the history of immigration and immigration policy along with other various aspects of immigration such as transnationalism, enculturation, marginalization, globalization, gendered migration, immigrant labor market, second generation and segmented assimilation. Prerequisite: SOC 101. (HBSSM, Intcl)

SOC 468 Seminar: Gender, Globalization, and Development

4 hours

In this course we will examine the phenomena of globalization and development from a sociology of gender perspective. We will focus on the global intersections of contemporary societies and cultures, and the gendered dynamics therein. Questions we will raise include: How does globalization affect women's and men's lives? How is power distributed, and how does this impact development processes? What impact do gender dynamics play in the social institutions of development: economic, political, and cultural? Prerequisite: SOC 101. (Same as WGST 468) (HBSSM, Intcl)

SOC 472 Seminar: Social Institutions

4 hours

An examination of selected major social institutions in American society (family, education, religion, politics, or industry), as well as their intersections and maintenance in social life. Prerequisite: SOC 101. (HBSSM)

SOC 475 Seminar: Social Movements

4 hours

Explores theoretical issues related to social movements—why they emerge, how they evolve, how they are organized, why people join them, what factors determine their success—while learning about various historical and contemporary social movements such as the Black civil rights, environmental, religious right, and gay rights movements. Prerequisite: SOC 101. Offered alternate years. (HBSSM)

SOC 490 Senior Project

1, 2, or 4 hours

SOC 493 Senior Honors Project

4 hours

A yearlong independent research project. Applications are completed on the Honors Program form available at the registrar's office, requiring the signatures of a faculty supervisor, the department head, the honors program director, and the registrar. Interdisciplinary projects require the signatures of two faculty supervisors. The project must be completed by the due date for senior projects. The completed project is evaluated by a review committee consisting of the faculty supervisor, another faculty member from the major department, and a faculty member from outside the major department. All projects must be presented publicly. Only projects awarded an "A-" or "A" qualify for "department honors" designation. The honors project fulfills the all-college senior project requirement. (HBSSM)