Philosophy Courses

PHIL 100 Introduction to Philosophy

4 hours

An introduction to basic questions in philosophy concerning God, the nature of reality, knowledge and truth, human nature, morality, and the individual in society, together with the range of arguments and answers that philosophers have developed in response to them. (HEPT)

PHIL 110 Logic

4 hours

A study of reasoning and argumentation, introducing formal symbol systems, including propositional and predicate logic, with attention to informal logic and fallacies. (Quant)

PHIL 120 Ethics

4 hours

A topical introduction to moral philosophy, considering both historical and contemporary developments. Topics include human nature, standards of morality, obligation and rights, justice, responsibility and freedom, character and action. (HEPT)

PHIL 130 Philosophy of Religion

4 hours

A study of attempts to bring rational justification and clarification to religious beliefs and practice, focusing primarily on the concepts of Christian theology. Topics may include: the existence and attributes of God, faith and reason, death and immortality, miracles and revelation, the problem of evil, and religious pluralism. (Same as REL 230) (HEPT)

PHIL 139, 239, 339, 439 Special Topics

Credit arr.

PHIL 140 Environmental Philosophy

4 hours

A study of the philosophical response to the environmental crisis. The course begins with a survey of environmental problems and a brief history of the environmental movement. It then examines various philosophical attempts to reevaluate human attitudes and responsibilities toward the nonhuman environment. (HEPT)

PHIL 150 Social and Political Philosophy

4 hours

An introduction to major social and political theories with focus on such concepts as obligation, law, authority, freedom, rights, justice, individual, community, ideology, and oppression. (HEPT)

PHIL 185 First-Year Seminar

4 hours

A variety of seminars for first-year students offered each January Term.

PHIL 200 Ancient Philosophy

4 hours

An examination of the development of philosophy among the Greek speaking peoples and the civilizations they influenced. Primary focus will be on the thought of Plato and Aristotle as the major founders of western philosophical thought, with a brief review of subsequent developments in Hellenistic and Roman philosophy. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy. (HEPT)

PHIL 220 Early Modern Philosophy

4 hours

An examination of the development of modern European philosophy. Primary focus will be on the formation of scientific philosophies in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries and upon the synthesis of these views in Kant's philosophy. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy. (HEPT)

PHIL 230 Philosophy of Science

4 hours

A study of the nature of scientific methodology, which has entitled the sciences (especially the natural sciences) to their authoritative status as reliable sources of knowledge and rational belief. This involves issues such as the relation between theory and evidence, the nature of confirmation, explanation, probability, and rational considerations in delivering and consuming scientific information. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy, or two courses in natural science. Offered alternate years. (HEPT, NWNL)

PHIL 240 Philosophy of Art

4 hours

A study of the nature of art and its relationship to the human condition. Issues covered include definitions of art, the relationship between art and the community, the nature of aesthetic experience, and standards of taste. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy, or two courses in fine arts. Offered alternate years. (HEPT)

PHIL 260 Feminist Philosophy

4 hours

Examination of feminist philosophies, including issues in epistemology, ethics, social philosophy, political philosophy, philosophy of religion and historical interpretation. Focus on the challenges which feminist theory presents to traditional philosophical assumptions in the Western tradition. This course counts as theory requirement for the WGST major. Prerequisite: one course in philosophy, or two courses in women's and gender studies. Offered alternate fall semesters. (Same as WGST 260) (HEPT, W)

PHIL 285/295 Directed Study

2, 4 hours

An opportunity to pursue individualized or experiential learning with a faculty member, at the sophomore level or above, either within or outside the major. PHIL 285 can be taken only during January Term, PHIL 295 can be taken during the fall, spring, or summer terms.

PHIL 300 19th and 20th Century Philosophy

4 hours

A study of philosophical movements that developed in response to German idealism, including existentialism, phenomenology, pragmatism, analytic and postmodern philosophy. Prerequisites: two courses in philosophy. Offered alternate years. (HEPT)

PHIL 310 Metaphysics and Epistemology

4 hours

A comparative and critical study of major theories about being and knowing. Metaphysical issues focus on the nature of reality, including the relationship between mind and matter, substance and attribute, time, space, causation, change, modality, and identity. Epistemological topics concern the possibility, origins, nature, and extent of human knowledge. The course includes classical as well as contemporary readings, covering a wide range of philosophical theories and their interaction. Prerequisite: two courses in philosophy. Offered alternate years. (HEPT)

PHIL 320 Topics in Value Theory

4 hours

Study of particular theories, movements, issues, major philosophers in value theory. Examples include major works in virtue ethics, utilitarian theory, deontological ethics. Prerequisite: two courses in philosophy. Offered alternate years. (HEPT)

PHIL 330 Philosophy of Mind

4 hours

An investigation of historical and contemporary attempts to address a wide range of questions concerning the mind and mental phenomena, such as: Is the mind independent of the body/brain? Can consciousness be explained? Can machines think? How can we account for personal identity? Is free will an illusion? Is evolutionary theory relevant to our understanding of the mind? Prerequisites: two courses in philosophy, or at least one course in psychology numbered 300 and above. Offered alternate years. (HEPT)

PHIL 375 Directed Readings

Credit arr.

PHIL 395 Independent Study

1, 2, or 4 hours

PHIL 400 Advanced Topics in Philosophy

4 hours

Designed for students with significant interest and experience in philosophy. Prerequisite: Three courses in philosophy. Offered alternate years.

PHIL 485 Seminar

4 hours

In-depth study of specific topics or philosophers in seminar format, designed for students with significant experience in philosophy. Prerequisite: three courses in philosophy. (W)

PHIL 490 Senior Project

1, 2, or 4 hours

PHIL 493 Senior Honors Project

4 hours

A yearlong independent research project. Applications are completed on the Honors Program form available at the registrar's office, requiring the signatures of a faculty supervisor, the department head, the honors program director, and the registrar. Interdisciplinary projects require the signatures of two faculty supervisors. The project must be completed by the due date for senior projects. The completed project is evaluated by a review committee consisting of the faculty supervisor, another faculty member from the major department, and a faculty member from outside the major department. All projects must be presented publicly. Only projects awarded an "A" or "A-" qualify for "department honors" designation. The honors project fulfills the all-college senior project requirement.