English Courses

ENG 110 Introduction to College Writing

2 hours

An introductory English course designed to help students become more fluent, confident, and effective writers and readers. Focus on strengthening skills in writing college-level essays, including identification of surface errors. Frequent writing, reading, and individual conferences. Hours do not count toward an English major or minor. Students may not earn credit for both ENG 110 and 114. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ENG 114 Introduction to U.S. Academic Writing

2 or 4 hours

This course helps students become fluent, confident, and effective writers and readers in U.S. academic culture. It strengthens skills in writing college-level essays (including thesis-driven, analytic essays), in responsible use of outside sources, and in making surface corrections and refinements. Some instruction takes place in individual conferences. Students will usually take this course concurrently with PAID 111. Students may not earn credit for both ENG 110 and 114.

ENG 130 Literary Ventures

4 hours

An introductory literature course, with specific focus and readings announced each semester. This course is both an introduction to the pleasures of reading and interpretation and also an opportunity for student writing in a range of analytic and creative forms. Open to all students in all majors. Students may enroll in more than one version of the course. Sample topics: Caribbean Women Writers, Literature of the Apocalypse, Multiple Hamlets, Poems for Life. (HEPT)

ENG 139, 239, 339, 439 Special Topics

Credit arr.

ENG 147 Literature of the African Peoples

4 hours

Modern African writers are some of the most dynamic and innovative writers as they draw from and respond to different literary traditions, such as their own oral and written traditions, as well as European models. This course serves as an introduction to the various themes and styles of written literature of the 20th century. Central to discussion will be an analysis of gender within various African cultural contexts. Understanding constructions of masculinity and femininity, dominant female and male roles in society, and the ways in which the works challenge traditional norms of gender will be priorities within applied theoretical approaches. Prerequisite: PAID 111 or transfer equivalent. (Same as AFRS 147 and WGST 147) (HEPT, Hist, Intcl)

ENG 185 First-Year Seminar

4 hours

A variety of seminars for first-year students offered each January term.

ENG 210 Effective Writing

4 hours

A writing course for students in all disciplines. The course includes practice and instruction in writing for a variety of audiences, emphasizing revising and responding to others' writing. Students discuss well-crafted prose essays that include effective argument and clear language and organization. This course cannot be taken concurrently with PAID 111 or 112. Prerequisites: PAID 111, 112 or transfer equivalents. (HE)

ENG 211 Writing for Media

4 hours

A comprehensive course in news writing, reporting, and writing for media. Focus on the issues and skills central to journalism and professional writing for various media. Readings and examples from newspapers, online and print magazines, and electronic journalism. Prerequisites: PAID 111, 112 or transfer equivalents. (HE)

ENG 212 Creative Writing: Poetry and Fiction I

4 hours

An introductory course in the writing of poems and stories that explore lived and imagined experience. Writing will include experiments in each genre and in-class exercises in craft inspired by a variety of readings in contemporary poetry and fiction. Student work will be discussed in a workshop format. Prerequisites: PAID 111, 112 or transfer equivalents. (HE)

ENG 213 Creative Writing: Nonfiction

4 hours

A reading and writing course in the art of the personal essay. Reading will survey the genre, examining essays from a variety of periods and kinds. Writing will include some larger pieces and attention to matters of craft such as voice, tone, and patterns of development, which will help students cultivate a personal style. Prerequisites: PAID 111, 112 or transfer equivalents. (HE)

ENG 230 The Writerís Voice

4 hours

When writers write, they sing, whisper, and shout. This course, an introduction to the English major, emphasizes literature and writing as forms of personal and cultural expression. Our central literary focus is on poetry, but may include fiction, drama, or nonfiction. The course also gives extended attention to student writing as a performative act, conscious of voice, audience, and purpose. Prerequisite: PAID 111 or transfer equivalent. (HEPT, W)

ENG 231 Film

4 hours

Study of the varieties of film experience from documentaries to feature-length films, American and foreign. Practice in film analysis and criticism of current films based upon viewing, discussing, and writing about films. Emphasis upon acquiring knowledge and appreciation of the techniques by which filmmakers achieve their effects, rather than upon systematic study of film history. Prerequisites: PAID 111, 112 or transfer equivalents. (HEPT)

ENG 240 Africana Women's Writing

4 hours

A study of writing by selected Africana women writers from Africa, the Caribbean, the United States, and elsewhere in the African diaspora. Topics may vary by geographic region or theme. Prerequisite: PAID 111 or transfer equivalent. (Same as AFRS 240 and WGST 240) (HEPT, Intcl)

ENG 245 Literature By Women

4 hours

A study of how women writers from different historical periods use poems, stories, essays, and plays to address gender issues in the private and public world. The course looks at how literature both presents and critiques culture and its construction of gender, as well as how it offers new visions and choices for women and men. Readings include such writers as Mary Wollstonecraft, Charlotte Bronte, Emily Dickinson, Toni Morrison, Gloria Anzaldua, and Octavia Butler. Prerequisite: PAID 111 or transfer equivalent. (Same as WGST 245) (HEPT)

ENG 247 Literature and Ecology

4 hours

What kinds of stories help us to confront, ignore, deny, or re-imagine the ecological challenges we face? How do we use narratives and poetry to perceive and imagine ecosystems? And why do we think things like mountains, wind turbines, fjords, limestone, bonobos, the influenza virus, or snow-globes are beautiful or ugly, natural or unnatural? This course explores how literature and other cultural texts shape the ways we think about and act in the biophysical world and the systems that comprise it. Readings will vary but may come from traditions of nature writing; explorations of place, space, and time; connections between religion and ecology; relationships linking literature and science; and intersections of ecology and social issues like ability, class, gender, and race. Prerequisites: PAID 111 and 112, or transfer equivalents. (HEPT)

ENG 251 African-American Literature

4 hours

A survey of African-American literature. Primary emphasis will be on literature written since 1920 when the Harlem Renaissance began. Includes authors such as Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, Zora Neale Hurston, Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, Alice Walker, and Toni Morrison and gives attention to theories of race and culture formation. Prerequisite: PAID 111 or transfer equivalent. (Same as AFRS 251 and WGST 251) (HEPT, Intcl, E, W)

ENG 260 Shakespeare

4 hours

For four centuries Shakespeare has been celebrated as the greatest writer in English. This course will help students more fully understand the power of his plays, both as literature for reading and scripts for performance. Reading plays of each major type (comedies, tragedies, and histories; typically seven to eight plays), we will explore such topics as language, moral vision, gender, politics, and historical context. Students will have the opportunity to explore their interpretations in writing and by staging a scene. Prerequisites: PAID 111, 112 or transfer equivalents. (HEPT, E, S)

ENG 261 Shakespeare Performed

4 hours

The study of approximately five representative Shakespeare plays, with special emphasis on the close analysis and public performance of one play. All students will do analytical writing and will be involved in some aspect of the performance. English 260 and 261 have common goals and both fulfill the departmental "Shakespeare" requirement, but because of the two courses' differing emphases, students may earn credit for both courses. Although students with previous experience in Shakespeare or acting are welcomed, the course is open to all students sophomore and above. Prerequisites: PAID 111, 112 or transfer equivalents. (Same as THE 261) (HEPT, E, S)

ENG 285/295 Directed Study

2, 4 hours

An opportunity to pursue individualized or experiential learning with a faculty member, at the sophomore level or above, either within or outside the major. ENG 285 can be taken only during January Term. ENG 295 can be taken during the fall, spring, or January terms.

ENG 312 Creative Writing: Poetry and Fiction II

4 hours

An advanced-level course in the writing of poems and stories for students dedicated to making imaginative, emotional, and technical discoveries in the practice of their craft. Readings in contemporary poetry and fiction, as well as in-class exercises and student workshops. Prerequisites: PAID 111, 112 or transfer equivalents, and ENG 212. (HE, S)

ENG 314 Rhetoric: History, Theory, Practice

4 hours

A study of the origin and development of rhetoric. Readings in rhetorical theory and case studies of oral and written rhetorical discourse with an emphasis on written composition. Extensive analytical and persuasive writing. Prerequisites: PAID 111, 112 or transfer equivalents. (HEPT)

ENG 320 Contemporary Literature

4 hours

A study of significant works written since 1945, predominantly by British and/or American writers, in both poetry and prose. Readings trace the recent evolution and refinement of literary techniques and themes, with emphasis on the variety of aesthetic responses to contemporary culture and thought. Prerequisites: PAID 111, 112 or transfer equivalents. (HEPT)

ENG 334 Young Adult Literature

4 hours

Study of literature for young adults (ages 12–18), with emphasis on reading of representative fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry. Course also includes history of the genre, interpretive approaches to texts, resources, and materials for teaching. Designed for teaching majors; useful for others working with young people. Prerequisites: PAID 111, 112 or transfer equivalents. (HEPT)

ENG 352 American Frontiers: American Literature to 1860

4 hours

American writers since the very beginnings have inscribed the natural landscape and crossed frontiers of the human heart and soul. We will explore these frontiers and the authors who transcend boundaries into uncharted space in stories of Spanish conquistadors and Native Americans; the narratives of English colonists, African-American slaves, and explorers Lewis and Clark; nature essays of Emerson and Thoreau, illustrated by the Hudson Valley School; poetry by Bradstreet, Wheatley, Whitman, and Dickinson; fiction by Hawthorne, Melville, and Beecher Stowe. Offered alternate years. Prerequisites: PAID 111, 112 or transfer equivalents. (HEPT, Hist)

ENG 353 American Literature 1860 to the Present

4 hours

An invitation to explore currents and crosscurrents, traditions and individual talents, movements and masterpieces from the Civil War era to the present. Works will be chosen from a variety of genres, and course units may emphasize particular regions, periods, or themes, such as Southern voices (Faulkner, Hurston, Welty), the era of World War I (Hemingway, Cummings, Dos Passos), and feminist fiction and poetry (Kingston, Walker, Sexton). Offered alternate years. Prerequisites: PAID 111, 112 or transfer equivalents. (HEPT)

ENG 354 American Novel

4 hours

A study of major American novelists from the mid-19th century to the present, such as Melville, Stowe, Twain, Cather, Faulkner, and Morrison. Some attention is given to theoretical approaches to American literature. Prerequisites: PAID 111, 112 or transfer equivalents. (HEPT)

ENG 361 Chaucer and Medieval Literature

4 hours

From heroes fighting monsters to Arthurian romances, medieval literature is best known for its stories of chivalry. Less well-known but equally wonderful are the comic tales of sex in trees and greedy friars dividing a fart. We will read Beowulf, narrative poems about love and adventure by Marie de France, the tale of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, and much more, with in-depth attention to Chaucer's Canterbury Tales. Prerequisite: junior standing. (Same as WGST 361) (HEPT)

ENG 362 Renaissance Literature

4 hours

English literature came into its own during the Renaissance, as Sidney, Spenser, and Raleigh courted Queen Elizabeth's favor through love poetry, and sonnets were all the vogue. The period also produced the counter-cultural poetry of Donne and Marvell, and profound religious lyrics of Herbert, and the golden age of English drama with the plays of Marlowe, Shakespeare, and Jonson. The course will explore this rich body of literature through both literary and cultural analysis, with options for a range of student writing. Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: junior standing. (HEPT)

ENG 363 Milton

4 hours

How could angels in Heaven and humans in Paradise rebel against the God who created the world and made it good? Is it better to rule in Hell than serve in Heaven? What would it be like to live in Edenic bliss, anyway? John Milton sought to answer those questions in Paradise Lost. Second only to Shakespeare in its influence on later writers, Milton's work probes religion, politics, and gender in a remarkable melding of classical and Christian traditions. We will read this epic, as well as other poems and prose in which Milton engaged the tumultuous events of the English civil wars and its aftermath. Prerequisite: junior standing. (HEPT)

ENG 364 Restoration and 18th-Century British Literature

4 hours

This course explores the range and variety of British literature written after the restoration of the British monarchy in 1660, and before the revolution in France in 1789. Literary artists in this era produced innovative writing in several new genres, including journalism, travel writing, biography, satire, and the novel. The literature of the 18th century was also a crucible for modern understandings of gender, race, and class identities. In this course, we explore these literary developments within their historical contexts, aiming for a broad coverage of canonical and not-so-canonical texts. Representative authors may include Dryden, Congreve, Behn, Swift, Pope, Johnson, Fielding, Burney, and Haywood. Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: junior standing. (HEPT, Hist)

ENG 365 British Romanticism: Revolution, Nature, and the Imagination

4 hours

The era of the American and French revolutions profoundly affected England, inspiring cultural debates about slavery and women's roles, as well as new ways of looking at the natural world, human perception, imaginative creation, and the Gothic past. We will study the cultural milieu and read such writers as Blake, Equiano, Burke, Wollstonecraft, Austen, William and Dorothy Wordsworth, Coleridge, Percy and Mary Shelley, Byron, and Keats. Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: junior standing. (HEPT)

ENG 366 The Victorians

4 hours

The Victorians experienced cataclysmic changes in science, economics and industry, national identity, gender roles, and faith. Novelists wrestled with these changes, chronicling the broad social world and the schisms that divided it. Poets of the period registered extremes of doubt, or returned to an idealized past, or looked forward to developments like the liberation of women. Representative authors may include the BrontŽs, Dickens, George Eliot, Hardy, Tennyson, and Barrett Browning. Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: junior standing. (HEPT)

ENG 367 Twentieth-Century British Literature

4 hours

Many Europeans braced themselves for the start of the 20th century, firm in their belief that it might augur the end of the world. For thousands of soldiers slaughtered during the "war to end all wars," it was. Between World War I and II, British writers and Irish nationalists transformed the literary landscape with a radically new approach to language, form, and style. Women writers explored new freedoms in sexuality and in their literary subjects. In the second half of the century, novelists and poets confronted the legacy of economic reform, urbanism, and the remnants of British colonialism around the globe. Readings might include writers such as Yeats, T. S. Eliot, Woolf, Forster, Katherine Mansfield, Jean Rhys, Ted Hughes, and Graham Greene. Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: junior standing. (HEPT)

ENG 368 The British Novel

4 hours

In Northanger Abbey, Jane Austen's narrator remarks, "The person, be it gentleman or lady, who has not pleasure in a good novel, must be intolerably stupid." In this course, we defy stupidity by enjoying a variety of good British novels, beginning with the eighteenth-century, and arriving, after many pages and multiple plot twists, in the modern era. We consider the history of the genre, the social and political context of the texts, and the development of the British literary tradition. Representative authors may include Burney, Fielding, Austen, Dickens, George Eliot, Thackeray, Conrad, and Woolf. Prerequisite: junior standing. (HEPT)

ENG 380 Internship

1, 2, or 4 hours

Supervised on-campus or off-campus work experience that builds on the strengths of an English major. Must have signature of department head. Open to sophomores (those who have completed PAID 111, 112 or transfer equivalents), juniors, and seniors. One 4-credit internship may be used as one of the three electives for the Plan I major, but not as one of the three writing courses required for the Plan II (writing emphasis) major, nor to satisfy requirements for the English minor or writing minor.

ENG 395 Independent Study

1, 2, or 4 hours

ENG 485 Seminar

4 hours

An intensive, collaborative study of a selected period, movement, or writers, emphasizing the methods and assumptions of literary analysis and selected critical theories. The course format is student-initiated discussion and presentation, with significant independent projects and an oral presentation. Intended primarily for seniors. Students–especially those preparing for graduate school–are encouraged to complete more than one seminar. Prerequisites: two courses from ENG 251, 352-354, 361-368. (S, R)

ENG 490 Senior Project

1, 2, or 4 hours

Together with the required Senior Seminar, the Senior Project is the English major's culminating experience. Projects build upon students' previous experience with scholarly research, creative writing, or the secondary education program. Students wishing to do a creative writing project are expected to complete the requirements for the English Writing Emphasis major. Ideally, these students would have completed the Writing Emphasis requirements and would have had coursework and sustained writing experience in the genre of their project. At a minimum, all students wishing to do a creative writing project must be completing their third writing course during the term in which the senior project will be submitted; students intending a creative nonfiction project must have completed ENG 210, 211, or 213; students intending a poetry or fiction project must have completed ENG 212, and must have completed or be completing ENG 312 during the term in which the senior project will be submitted. Permission to register for a senior project will be given after submission of the application form available on the English department website. The application form also outlines the required oral presentation component. Registration ought to be completed during the semester preceding the semester in which the project is begun. The English department does not require students with more than one major to complete an English senior project. (R)

ENG 493 Senior Honors Project

4 hours

A yearlong independent research project. Applications are completed on the Honors Program form available at the registrar's office, requiring the signatures of a faculty supervisor, the department head, the honors program director, and the registrar. Interdisciplinary projects require the signatures of two faculty supervisors. The project must be completed by the due date for senior projects. The completed project is evaluated by a review committee consisting of the faculty supervisor, another faculty member from the major department, and a faculty member from outside the major department. All projects must be presented publicly. Only projects awarded an "A-" or "A" qualify for "department honors" designation. The honors project fulfills the all-college senior project requirement. (S)