Economics Courses

ECON 130 Principles of Economics

4 hours

An introduction to the uses of economic theory in the analysis of problems emergent in large societies. Specific topics include consumer choice, decision making by firms in price taking and price searching situations, and inflation and aggregate employment analysis. No prerequisite. (HBSSM, E)

ECON 139, 239, 339, 439 Special Topics

Credit arr.

ECON 142 Economic Numeracy

4 hours

An introduction to the empirical problems in understanding economic choice, opportunity, and policy. Designed to improve the student's quantitative sophistication in understanding economic problems and issues by combining an introduction to macroeconomic data sources, elementary economic simulation techniques, and regular interpretation/analysis of public presentation of quantitative economic information. (Quant)

ECON 185 First-Year Seminar

4 hours

A variety of seminars for first-year students offered each January Term.

ECON 247 Intermediate Economic Theory: Macro

4 hours

Analysis of the factors influencing the aggregate level of national income, employment, and inflation from a variety of perspectives, including the post-Keynesian. Prerequisites: ECON 130 and ECON 142 or consent of instructor. (HBSSM)

ECON 248 Intermediate Economic Theory: Micro

4 hours

Analysis of the determinants of resource allocation and income distribution with emphasis on the consequences of different methods of dealing with scarcity. Prerequisites: ECON 130 and ECON 142, or consent of instructor. (HBSSM, Quant)

ECON 255 Environmental Economics

4 hours

The application of economic principles to environmental issues. Valuation of environmental damage and environmental improvements, including nonmarket approaches. Methods of environmental regulation, such as taxes, standards, and transferable permits. Other topics such as climate change and species loss may also be covered. Prerequisite: ECON 130. (HBSSM, E, W)

ECON 256 Economic History

4 hours

This course focuses on applying basic methods of economic way of thinking (cost/benefit analysis, supply and demand analysis, simulation) through empirical examination of episodes in American, European and world history. Prerequisite: ECON 130. (HB, Hist, E, W)

ECON 268 Law and Economics

4 hours

The economic way of thinking is used to explore the relationships between law and economics, to consider how different kinds of laws and legal structures will/should/might work. Real-world examples—real statutes, real cases—are used throughout to focus discussion in a comparison of competing models of law and economics. Prerequisite: ECON 130. (HBSSM, E, W)

ECON 285/295 Directed Study

2, 4 hours

An opportunity to pursue individualized or experiential learning with a faculty member, at the sophomore level or above, either within or outside the major. ECON 285 can be taken only during January Term, ECON 295 can be taken during the fall, spring, or summer terms.

ECON 333 Economics of Information and Networks

4 hours

A course exploring the economics of information, language, and networks. Microeconomic examination of how individual choices are shaped by information costs and asymmetries is combined with macroeconomic consideration of how information networks shape and/or frustrate public policy. Particular emphasis given to the economic consequences of language and the effects of information on entrepreneurship. Prerequisite: ECON 130. (HBSSM, E)

ECON 342 Introduction to Econometrics

4 hours

An introduction to the techniques of econometric analysis. Students will learn to use techniques of statistical significance and regression to test theories and draw inferences from economic and other social science data. Topics include simple and multiple linear regression, multicollinearity, autoregression, and heteroscedasticity. Prerequisite: ECON 130. (HBSSM)

ECON 361 Money, Credit, and Banking

4 hours

Development of the monetary and banking system. Nature and functions of monetary theories and policy. Prerequisites: ECON 130 and ECON 247, or consent of instructor. (HBSSM)

ECON 362 International Economics

4 hours

Study of international economic principles necessary for understanding the world economy and economic exchanges that cross political boundaries. Topics include trade theory, governmental policies, international finance, foreign exchange markets, multinational corporations, and Third World perspectives. Prerequisite: ECON 130 and ECON 248. (HBSSM, E, Intcl)

ECON 366 Public Finance

4 hours

Economic analysis of activity undertaken through government, mainly in the areas of social insurance and taxation. For each program and policy we ask what might be expected on theoretical grounds, and follow up by examining the empirical record. Prerequisite: ECON 130 and ECON 248. (HBSSM)

ECON 375 Directed Readings

1, 2 or 4 hours

Students who develop an interest in a specialized area of the discipline for which course offerings are limited may follow a prescribed reading list under the direction of a member of the faculty with expertise in that area.

ECON 380 Internship

1, 2, or 4 hours

On-the-job learning experience in government or industry. The plan must be presented for departmental approval before the experience begins. (Note: Those students with less than a 2.50 GPA in the major must have departmental approval before interviewing.)

ECON 395 Independent Study

1, 2, or 4 hours

ECON 485 Seminar

Credit arr.

ECON 490 Senior Project

4 hours

This course requires students to draw upon their economic education to formulate and address important public policy, business, and ethical questions. Students meet in a seminar setting to study and discuss topics of special interest through the prism of an economic way of thinking. Students are also required to write and publicly present a research paper in which they apply their own economic analysis to an issue. Prerequisite: senior standing.

ECON 493 Senior Honors Project

4 hours

A yearlong independent research project. Applications are completed on the Honors Program form available at the registrar's office, requiring the signatures of a faculty supervisor, the department head, the honors program director, and the registrar. Interdisciplinary projects require the signatures of two faculty supervisors. The project must be completed by the due date for senior projects. The completed project is evaluated by a review committee consisting of the faculty supervisor, another faculty member from the major department, and a faculty member from outside the major department. All projects must be presented publicly. Only projects awarded an "A-" or "A" qualify for "department honors" designation. The honors project fulfills the all-college senior project requirement. (S, R)